Architecture for Liturgy

a liturgy week

26-29 May 2015
Tuesday to Friday
following Memorial Day

at
St Benedict’s Abbey
Mount St Scholastica Monastery
Atchison, Kansas

Liturgy Week

The celebration of liturgy determines not only the functional aspects of church design and arrangement, but even more the dimensions inherent in liturgical celebration are expressed through art, architecture and the arrangement of churches. Much attention is given to architects who design transcendent buildings, but insufficient attention has been given to the ritual and liturgical theology inherent in the celebration of liturgy and how these are determinative of the dimensions of church buildings and their artistic narratives.

Liturgy Week 2015 begins with a pictorial journey through the ancient basilicas of Rome and from these develops an understanding of the baptistery and font, the hall and ambo, the dais and altar-ciborium. The rich and classical chapels of Mount St Scholastica Monastery and St Benedict parish church give examples to illustrate the liturgical principles presented, or they present a canvas upon which to write a more developed artistic and architectural expression that allows for an ever more prolonged and synthetic celebration of liturgy.

The opportunity to pray with these two monastic communities in their churches and to join them for meals in their monastic refectories (dining rooms) gives greater insight into the communities that shaped their respective places of worship and that are shaped by them as well.

Liturgy Week 2015 is intended for anyone interested in the dimensions inherent in liturgy that prompt a fuller celebration which in turn requires a more developed architectural and artistic expression. Liturgy Week 2015 is designed for:

Parishioners preparing to renovate or build a church or chapel (send a group of parishioners)
Architects desiring to deepen one’s appreciation of the liturgical dimensions of design
Diocesan directors of offices of worship or commissions that govern the building or renovation of churches
Oblates desiring a deeper appreciation of their prayer life in its context.

The presentations will be clear and given in ordinary language for the informed person and will be richly illustrated by pictorial journeys. This accessibility gives direct and immediate access to the more inherent dimensions of liturgical celebrations.

Learning Goals

Participants will acquire an historical perspective from a pictorial tour of Roman basilicas and those of Jerusalem and Constantinople so that they may describe the elements and arrangement of any church today.

Participants will learn to articulate how a fuller celebration of liturgy requires a fuller development of the artistic narrative and architectural design and arrangement of a church.

Participants will learn to describe how the dimensions inherent in the celebration of liturgy are expressed in the three dimensions of space in a church and the dimension of time throughout a day, season, year.

Participants will consider and evaluate several different arrangements of churches and their contributions and weaknesses in developing a more comprehensive ritual model.

Participants will be introduced to the ritual model developed from the work of Prof. em. Crispino Valenziano which can help them articulate a full synthesis of action, art and architecture capable of supporting a more prolonged narrative in the liturgical celebration.

Participants will be ready to develop a fuller celebration of liturgy by developing a fuller artistic narrative and architectural design and arrangement.

Tuesday 26 May 2015

Image of the altar and ciborium of San Clemente, Rome - Architecture for liturgyRoman Basilicas: a pictorial journey with surprising finds

The basilicas of Rome survive from Christian antiquity and have been adapted in every era revealing much of the history of church architecture in their rich beauty. Their antiquity and continuity preserve elements that challenge contemporary church architecture. The first session from 1:30-2:45 will consider the Lateran basilica (the Cathedral church of Rome), St. Peter’s basilica and the basilica of St Paul Outside the Walls. The second session from 3:15-4:30 will feature the basilica of St Mary Major and St Stephen in the Round (San Stephano Rotondo). Given by Fr Daniel in the Abbey crypt.

During the evening, small groups will be free to discuss the challenges these ancient churches pose to contemporary practice.

Wednesday 27 May 2015

The thought of Prof. em. Crispino Valenziano: the basis of this week

Prof. em. Crispino Valenziano recently retired from his post as a professor of the Pontifical Institute of Liturgy, Sant’Anselmo, Rome. His unique synthesis is little known outside Italian academic circles, but is instrumental in elaborating and deepening an architecture for liturgy. Fr Daniel was his student while conducting doctoral studies at Sant’Anselmo and so introduces the taught of Prof. Crispino Valenziano to the US in this debut event. His thought given in this presentation structures the whole of this Liturgy Week. It centers on the three primacies, each with its proper monument situated in its proper room:

1. The baptismal font is the monument of illumination in the baptistry,
2. The ambo is the monument for the proclamation of the good news in the nave,
3. The altar-ciborium is the monument of consummation on the dais.

The difference between allegorical and sacramental-symbolic interpretations of liturgy and architecture will be introduced, and the understanding of the organic development of liturgy as developed by the liturgical commission appointed by Pope Pius XII in the late 1940s will be presented. Presentation given by Fr Daniel, 8:30-10:00 in the Abbey crypt.

baptistry, Visitation Parish - Architecture for liturgyBaptistery and font: A pictorial journey of their history, ritual, theology, art and architecture

The practice of baptism and the design of the font express different images of baptism present in the scripture such as the image of dying and rising with Christ in Paul’s letter to the Romans, or the image of being born again in the Gospel of John. An understanding of how early, fuller baptismal practices evolved into more minimal practices can help in the recovery of a fuller practice more adequate to the renewed liturgy.

The baptistry is considered an expression of baptismal illumination. Its design and relationship to the main body of the church are important in developing the ritual model of church architecture, which parallels Christian initiation from baptism to communion.  Presentation given by Fr Daniel, 10:30-11:30 in the Abbey crypt.

Tour of St Benedict Church

A representative of the parish community will give a tour of the church and describe its origins and the history of its development. The welcome begins at 2:30 in the parish church and the tour continues until 3:30.

St Benedict’s Parish Church and related architecture, art, ritual and liturgical theology

The former arrangement of the altar-ciborium remains in place in this parish church. This church was renovated for the renewed liturgy by the all to common practice of bringing the altar closer to the people and then extending the sanctuary by removing front pews, which had the effect of distancing the people. The pastoral efforts and their weaknesses will be presented in light of the three primacies, their places and monuments as developed by Prof. Valenziano.

This is the mother church of Atchison, formerly the Abbey church and the first Catholic parish established in the city. As mother, the role of the baptismal font might be developed to a greater extent than afforded by the large seashell in the transept. Fr. Daniel will present one possible way in which to develop the baptismal font and the baptistry as a place of illumination.

The vertical dimension or the axis mundi or “pole of the earth” is well developed in the architecture of this church, which illustrates the weakness of an altar placed in the geographic center of a church. In contrast, the former altar is central yet placed geographically off-center in the apse, which allowed a distinct axis mundi to be developed.

The renovation indicates the importance given to facing the people in the discussions at the Second Vatican Council. Reclaiming the ambo tradition, however, could further develop its dimension of the liturgy in this parish church. Presentation given by Fr. Daniel, 4:00-5:00 in St. Benedict Church.

During the evening, small groups will be free to discuss the three primacies, especially the primacy of illumination in the baptistry with its monument the baptismal font. Some may develop alternative design proposals for the baptistry of St. Benedict Parish Church

Thursday 28 May 2015

image of the ambo of Santa Maria in Cosmedin - Architecture for liturgy

Ambo and hall: A pictorial journey of their history, ritual, theology, art and architecture

The distinction between an ambo, lectern and pulpit will begin the presentation which continues with a pictorial journey of the ambo in history, ritual, theology, art and architecture. The ambo remains one of the least developed elements of contemporary church architecture, even though the renewed liturgy of the Word and revised lectionary are some of the richest developments following the Second Vatican Council. Recovery of the ambo with its proper symbolic structure is key in the development of church architecture more adequate to the renewed liturgy of the Word. Presentation given by Fr Daniel, 8:30-10:00 and 10:30-11:30 in the Abbey crypt.

Tour of the Choir Chapel, Mount St Scholastica Monastery

Sr Judith Sutera, OSB will give a tour of their chapel and describe how the art and architectural design and arrangement reflects their way of life and informs their prayer. The welcome begins at 2:30 in the choir chapel and the tours continue until 3:30.

The Choir Chapel and related architecture, art, ritual and liturgical theology

The presentation includes the two-part structure of the liturgy and the two-table arrangement of the chapel with an eucharistic table and a table for the word of God. Fr. Daniel will summarize the discussion during the Second Vatican Council regarding such a two-table arrangement along with its weakness. The placement of the table of the word in the midst of the assembly gathered in the hall follows historical patterns. Ways to incorporate an ambo with its symbolic structure proper to the liturgy of the word will be presented. Presentation given by Fr Daniel, 4:00-5:00 in the choir chapel, Mount St Scholastica Monastery.

During the evening, small groups will be free to discuss the value of the ambo tradition and its relevance for contemporary liturgical practice.

Friday 29 May 2015

Image of the altar and ciborium in the Cathedral of St Lawrence, Trapani, Sicily - Architecture for liturgyThe Dais with its altar-ciborium: A pictorial journey of their history, ritual, theology, art and architecture

A pictorial tour of the design and arrangement of altars in early Roman basilicas and in Constantinople and their later development will shed light on the artistic narrative around the altar with particular focus on development of the ciborium or baldachin standing over the altar and of the altar back or reredos. This historical survey helps to situate the current discussion about the placement and design of the altar.

The liturgical-theological dimension of the liturgy as memorial finds expression in the design and placement of altars. The role of the Holy Spirit in all liturgical prayer is projected in the architecture of the ciborium or baldachin.

Reclaiming the altar-ciborium combination from Roman examples would help in developing different places for the altar, ambo and chair, in contrast to the center-thrust sanctuary common in more recently built or renovated churches. Presentation given by Fr Daniel, 8:30-10:00 in the Abbey crypt.

Ritual Model synthesis

Over the course of the week we shall discuss the basis of the ritual model, the three primacies, their places and monuments. These correspond to the process of Christian initiation consisting of being baptized in the water bath and anointed and then being brought to share in communion in the Lord’s supper. After one is so initiated, the process repeats with the liturgy of the word and shared communion. This ritual pattern also structures the places of celebration.

As a model, the ritual model is synthetic of other more limited arrangements and elements such as the two-part structure of liturgy seen in the two tables for the liturgy of the word and the eucharistic liturgy. The desire to stand together around a central altar finds a fuller context in the ritual model, as does the pastoral decision to face the people. These and other arrangements are integrated into a more prolonged ritual narrative in the ritual model whose three primacies are synthetic of the whole mystery in rites and symbols proper to each primacy.

The three churches we visit provide examples of the classic Roman basilica with a processional way leading to the altar-ciborium (St Scholastica chapel), the two-table pattern with the distinction between the place for the liturgy of the word and the eucharistic liturgy (choir chapel), the central altar arrangement with the celebration of liturgy facing the people (parish church). The contribution each makes and the limitations of each will be indicated with reference to the fuller ritual model developed from the thought of Prof. em. Crispino Valenziano. Presentation given by Fr Daniel, 10:30-11:30 St Scholastica chapel.

Tour of the St Scholastica Chapel, Mount St Scholastica Monastery

Sr Judith Sutera, OSB, will give a tour of the St Scholastica Chapel chapel and describe how the art and architectural design and arrangement reflects their way of life and informs their prayer. The tour begins at 1:30 in the big chapel and continues until 2:30.

St Scholastica Chapel and related architecture, art, ritual and liturgical theology

This classic Roman basilica emphasizes the processional way of the hall leading to the dais with its altar and ciborium. This altar-ciborium has an unusual, double iconographic narrative.

This chapel is used in particular for religious professions of the sisters, indicating the need for a ‘profession stone’, an axis mundi, “pole of the earth”.

The lectern is one of the more under developed elements of the arrangement, suggesting the possibility of an ambo with its proper symbolic structure.Presentation given by Fr Daniel 3:00-4:00 in St Scholastica chapel, Mount St Scholastica Monastery.

Concluding comments at 4:00 will precede departure shortly thereafter.

Monday,
20 Jan 2020
Tuesday,
21 Jan 2020
Wednesday,
22 Jan 2020
Thursday,
23 Jan 2020
Friday,
24 Jan 2020
This is a proposed schedule yet to be confirmed in its details.8:30-10:00
Lecture: Fr. Daniel:
Vatican II arrangements
8:30-10:00
Lecture: Fr. Daniel:
Thought of Valenziano.
Baptistery & font
8:30-10:00
Lecture: Fr. Daniel:
Altar - Ciborium
8:30-10:00
Lecture: Fr. Daniel:
reservation
10:00-10:20
Refreshments
10:00-10:20
Refreshments
10:00-10:20
Refreshments
10:00-10:20
Refreshments
Morning: Arrival10:20-11:30
Lecture: Fr. Daniel:
Vatican II arrangements
10:20-11:30
Lecture: Fr. Daniel:
The ambo
10:20-11:30
Lecture: Fr. Daniel:
Vertical axis
10:20-11:30
Lecture: Fr. Daniel:
Ritual model

11:30-11:45
Certificates
11:45-12:45
Lunch, Cafeteria
11:45-12:45
Lunch, Cafeteria
11:45-12:45
lunch, Cafeteria
11:45-12:45
Lunch, Cafeteria
11:45-12:45
lunch, Cafeteria
Afternoon
1:00 welcome
1:15-2:15
Lecture: Fr. Daniel: Roman Basilicas
2:15-2:35 refreshments
2:35-3:35
Lecture cont.
3:35-4:00 refreshments
4:00-5:00
lecture cont.
Afternoon
1:00 depart for visit to Our Lady of Loreto Parish, 18000 E. Arapahoe Rd., Foxfield, Colorado 80016
303-766-3800
www.ourladyofloreto.org

Personal time
Lecture: Fr. Daniel
Refreshments
guided tour
Afternoon
1:00 depart for visit to Most Precious Blood Parish, 3959 E. Iliff Ave., Denver, Colorado 80210
303-756-3083
www.mpbdenver.org

Personal time
Lecture: Fr. Daniel
Refreshments
guided tour
Afternoon
1:00 depart for visit to Holy Ghost Parish, 1900 California St., Denver, Colorado 80202
(303) 292-1556
www.holyghostchurch.org

Personal time
Lecture: Fr. Daniel
Refreshments
guided tour
supper, cafeteria
(time to be determined)

6:30-7:30
visit chapel of SJV Seminary nearby
6:00-7:00
supper, cafeteria
6:00-7:00
supper, cafeteria
6:00-7:00
supper, cafeteria
7:00-8:00
Church visit
Personal time
Lecture: Fr. Daniel
7:00-8:00
Participant presentation
7:00-8:00
Participant presentation
7:00-8:00
Participant presentation

Image of Daniel McCarthyFr Daniel McCarthy, OSB, SLD

is a monk of St Benedict’s Abbey, Atchison, Kansas. In 2008 he earned a Doctorate in Sacred Liturgy (SLD) studying church architecture at the Pontifical Institute of Liturgy at Sant’Anselmo, Rome. His doctoral thesis traces the historical development of the presidential chair (the chair the priest sits in for Mass). Because the chair is the weaker element compared to the altar and ambo (or lectern), his research required an understanding of the interrelationship of all these elements in the overall design of a church.

Fr Daniel is a guest professor of the Catholic University Leuven, in Belgium and is co-founder and instructor of liturgy at the Liturgy Institute at Ealing Abbey, London. Fr Daniel has published a series of articles on church architecture in The Tablet of London. He is currently amplifying his doctoral research and preparing it for publication in English. Fr Daniel has previous degrees in theology:

S.L.D, Doctorate in Sacred Liturgy, Pontifical Institute of Liturgy, Sant’Anselmo 2008
S.L.L, License in Sacred Liturgy, Pontifical Institute of Liturgy, Sant’Anselmo
M.A. specializing in liturgy from the Notre Dame summer program, 1999
M.Div. from St John’s Seminary, Collegeville, Minnesota where he studied under the church designer Frank Kasmarcik.

Monetary amounts subject to change upon review. Page in development.

Cost $375.00 per person, $315.00 each for two people sharing a limited number of double rooms. This includes room, board and event fee.

Non-residential cost$225.00 includes lunch, supper and refreshments. This is intended for local residents.

Deposit $50.00 to guarantee a place.

Airport transportation$80.00 for both pick-up and drop-off at Kansas City International Airport (MCI)

Friday night stay$50.00 for supper, room and breakfast for those who do not depart until Saturday morning.

Because this experience is of a whole, we would prefer that participants be present for all the presentations. Thus, no discount is given for those who cannot attend the entire experience.

Because this event is not sponsored by Benedictine College, its faculty and staff are charged at the above rates.

On Friday May 1, we shall allocate the rooms for those who have given a deposit. Thereafter people may register for available spaces.

Paymentin full may be made upon registration

OR a non-refundable deposit of $50.00 is due upon registration with payment in full upon arrival.

Payment is made either online with registration (by credit card) OR by phone (with a credit card) by calling Fr Maurice Haefling at 1 (913) 367-7853

OR 
by sending a check made out to:

“St Benedict’s Abbey” note: “liturgy week”

and posted to:

Fr. Maurice Haefling, OSB
St Benedict’s abbey
1020 North Second Street
Atchison, KS 66002

Fr Maurice will reimburse Mount St Scholastica Monastery for room, board and other fees. It is easier for both communities all fees are channeled through one person.

Online registration is available here:

Fill out my online form.


Otherwise, you may register in advance by phone (with a credit card) by calling Fr Maurice Haefling at 1 (913) 367-7853

OR you may register 
by sending a check for the full amount or a $50.00 non-refundable deposit made out to:

“St Benedict’s Abbey” note: “liturgy week”

and posted to:

Fr. Maurice Haefling, OSB
St Benedict’s abbey
1020 North Second Street
Atchison, KS 66002

Mount / Abbey: Please indicate whether you prefer to stay at the Mount or at the Abbey.

Single / couple: Please state whether you are registering as a single person or as a couple. The rooms at the Abbey have two single beds, whereas the rooms at the Mount have one queen size bed.

Share a room: If you are single, but would like to share a room with another person, please indicate this so we can try to arrange a room in the Abbey with two single beds.

Rooms will not be assigned until one month prior to the Liturgy Week so that we can arrange for the best use of our limited accommodation at the Abbey. No one registered will be denied a room.

Airport pick up / drop off: Please indicate if you need to be picked up from the airport. Our local airport is MCI, known as the Kansas City International Airport. It is located 45 minutes drive from Atchison.

This experience is currently not offered for credit.

I would like to develop this program as a master’s level course.

Credit seeking students would be expected to read a fuller bibliography.

Criteria for evaluation would include a written essay and / or an oral exam.

Recommended reading to accompany the presentations is given on the bibliography page of this web-site.